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January 9, 2019

New guideline provides recommendations for the treatment of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis

This guideline will reduce practice variation and promote high-quality, high-value care for patients with mild–moderate disease.
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Bethesda, MD (Jan. 9, 2019) — Most patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have mild-to-moderate disease characterized by periods of activity or remission, but practice variations exist in disease management. A new clinical guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of AGA, addresses the medical management of these patients, focusing on use of both oral and topical 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) medications, rectal corticosteroids and oral budesonide, to promote high-quality care for UC patients.

AGA’s new clinical guideline is meant to help with the management of patients with mild-to-moderate UC, but not all patients will effectively respond to the outlined therapies. In those cases, there may be a need to escalate treatment to systemic corticosteroids, immunomodulators and/or biologic therapies for induction and maintenance of remission. However, the use of biologic therapies and/or immunomodulators are not specifically addressed within the guideline. 

Mild-to-moderate UC was defined as patients with fewer than four to six bowel movements per day, mild or moderate rectal bleeding, absence of constitutional symptoms, low overall inflammatory burden, and absence of features suggestive of high inflammatory activity. Although disease activity exists on a spectrum, patients in the mild-to-moderate category who have more frequent bowel movements, more prominent rectal bleeding or greater overall inflammatory burden should be considered to have moderate disease.

The guideline recommends the following for the medical management of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis: 
1.    Use either standard dose mesalamine (2-3 grams/day) or diazo-bonded 5-ASA rather than low dose mesalamine, sulfasalazine or no treatment in patients with extensive mild-moderate UC. (Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence)

2.    In patients with extensive or left-sided mild-moderate UC, add rectal mesalamine to oral 5-ASA. (Conditional recommendation, moderate quality evidence)

3.    In patients with mild–moderate UC with suboptimal response to standard-dose mesalamine or diazo-bonded 5-ASA or with moderate disease activity, use high-dose mesalamine (>3 g/d) with rectal mesalamine. (Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence [induction of remission], low-quality evidence [maintenance of remission])

4.    In patients with mild–moderate UC being treated with oral mesalamine, use once-daily dosing rather than multiple times per day dosing. (Conditional recommendation, moderate quality evidence)

5.    In patients with mild–moderate UC, use standard-dose oral mesalamine or diazo-bonded 5-ASA, rather than budesonide MMX or controlled ileal-release budesonide for induction of remission. (Conditional recommendation, low quality of evidence)

6.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis or proctitis, use mesalamine enemas (or suppositories) rather than oral mesalamine. (Conditional recommendation, very-low-quality evidence

7.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis who choose rectal therapy over oral therapy, use mesalamine enemas rather than rectal corticosteroids.(Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence

8.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctitis who choose rectal therapy over oral therapy, use mesalamine suppositories. (Strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence)

9.    In patients with mild–moderate ulcerative proctosigmoiditis or proctitis being treated with rectal therapy who are intolerant of or refractory to mesalamine suppositories, use rectal corticosteroid therapy rather than no therapy for induction of remission. (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence)

10.    In patients with mild–moderate UC refractory to optimized oral and rectal 5-ASA, regardless of disease extent, add either oral prednisone or budesonide MMX. (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence)

11.    In patients with mild–moderate UC , AGA makes no recommendation for use of probiotics. (No recommendation, knowledge gap)

12.    In patients with mild–moderate UC despite 5-ASA therapy, AGA makes no recommendation for use of curcumin. (No recommendation, knowledge gap)

13.    In patients with mild–moderate UC without Clostridium difficile infection, AGA recommends fecal microbiota transplantation be performed only in the context of a clinical trial. (No recommendation for treatment of ulcerative colitis, knowledge gap)

UC is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is most frequently seen in young adults. It is a chronic illness, of which the severity is classified as mild-to-moderate or moderate-to-severe. Most patients experience mild-to-moderate symptoms, with periods of remission and relapse. About 15 to 30 percent of patients with IBD have a family member with the disease. There is research underway to find out if a certain gene or a group of genes makes a person more likely to have IBD.

The guideline is accompanied by a technical review that is a compilation of the clinical evidence based on which these recommendations were framed.

Read the “American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis” to review the complete treatment recommendations.


Resource

Inflammatory bowel disease overview 
https://www.gastro.org/practice-guidance/gi-patient-center/topic/inflammatory-bowel-disease-ibd

Reference

Ko, C.W., Singh, S., Feuerstein, J.D., Falck-Ytter, C., Falck-Ytter, Y., Cross, R.K. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis. Gastroenterology (2019), doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.12.009 https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(18)35407-6/fulltext?referrer=https%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2FEwZ10Ex1wr 

Singh, S., Feuerstein, J.D., Binion, D.G., Tremaine, W.J.. American Gastroenterological Association Technical Review on the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis. Gastroenterology (2019), doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.12.008 https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(18)35406-4/fulltext 

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Media contact: Lucia Allen, media@gastro.org, 301-272-1608


About the AGA Institute 

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, AGA has grown to include more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. www.gastro.org.

About Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute, is the most prominent scientific journal in the specialty and is in the top 1 percent of indexed medical journals internationally. The journal publishes clinical and basic science studies of all aspects of the digestive system, including the liver and pancreas, as well as nutrition. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Biological Abstracts, Current Awareness in Biological Sciences, Chemical Abstracts, Current Contents, Excerpta Medica, Index Medicus, Nutrition Abstracts and Science Citation Index. For more information, visit www.gastrojournal.org.
 
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